Recline Me a River

airline.seats_0With all the time I spent on airplanes this past week, and being crammed into the last 7 rows  which on my flight meant two less inches of legroom (beware anything past row 35) this has been on my mind, and body, a bit.  I remember sitting there sometime during my 10 hours, wondering what my fibroblasts were up to and trying various strategies to keep them from freaking out.

Do you ever wonder who designed those things and how? Well. wonder no more. A  project known as  the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource project, measured the bodies of 4,431 people in North America, the Netherlands and Italy. The survey collected a voluminous amount of data about its subjects, ranging from height and weight to shoe and bra size.

And  – Seat designers often make the assumption that nearly everyone will be accommodated if they design a seat for a man in the 95th percentile of measurements, meaning that they are larger than all but 5 percent of other men — and, theoretically, all women.

But you know it’s not that simple. Sit down and read all about it here.

And if you suffer from “Economy Class Syndrome” here’s  some helpful hints.

I’m Back!

IMG_7820Sort of.

It’s been an intense week at the 2014 Fascia Research Summer School.

Besides having meetings, seeing old friends and colleagues, videotaping the conference proceedings, absorbing new information, getting food poisoning (true!), helping DJ the conference party, chatting with a reporter from NatGEO, chasing down presenters for their slides  and giving a Focus Presentation on Fascia as the Conduit of the Mind/Body Connection – I actually thought I was going to be able to live blog about what was going on while it was going on??? What evah’ was I thinking?

Well. I’m definitely not thinking now. The blog will be back to normal next week. Thanks for your patience.

Photo: Robert Schleip and Werner Klingler of the Fascia Research Department at Ulm University with a jersey presented to them by keynote speaker Klaus Eder who works with, and does fascial work on, the World Cup winning German soccer team. Coordinator extraordinaire Pia Schmutte looks on.

Mapping Our Emotions

13-21664-large-b12e81ec59ec77bd24c6abc7cf6a221346ed3bdd-s4-c85From this NPR storyWhen a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.

People reported that happiness and love sparked activity across nearly the entire body, while depression had the opposite effect: It dampened feelings in the arms, legs and head. Danger and fear triggered strong sensations in the chest area, the volunteers said. And anger was one of the few emotions that activated the arms.

Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, who was not involved in this study, says he’s “delighted” by Nummenmaa’s findings… ”People look at emotions as something in relation to other people, but emotions also have to do with how we deal with the environment — threats and opportunities.”

Leaving on a Jet Plane – for the Latest on Fascia

IMG_5028Okay, so here’s the reason for the “easy” food posts this week, not that it’s filler, but  I’ve been a little busier than usual– I’m leaving today for the bi-annual Fascia Research Summer School at Ulm University in Germany! I will be doing my usual video documenting of the event, giving a small lecture, and Live-Blogging! So as the cool/interesting/unexpected  stuff happens you’ll read about it here first – though with the time differences,  the new post schedule will be different.

I will still try to pass along any interesting news that comes my way. Below is a video trailer for the last Fascia Summer School, and DVDs of those proceedings are available here.

Photo by David, flying over the Andes, or the Ozarks, or somewhere…

Free, Free, Gluten Free

I usually don’t weigh in on nutritional matters, not my specialty and too complex, but of course my patients ask me anyway, and I like to point out solid information where I can. Here’s some:

To Kegel or Not to Kegel?

Last week I posted a very popular breathing video. Among several highlights it includes a very nice animation of  how the pelvic floor moves during respiration. Nicole Crawford, of the excellent breakingmuscle.com, profiles Katy Bowman‘s advocation of not doing kegels. Her solution for a healthy pelvic floor? Squats.

It’s the alignment of the pelvis and sacrum that gets out of whack, so knowing where your pelvis should be as you move throughout the day (sitting, standing and walking), done in conjunction with a few daily squats (get a squatty potty and this doesn’t even require extra time!) will get the full restorative effect your pelvic floor needs.

Read the full  post here

Sunday Matinee Special

Came back to the well for a sip of water. And it was so refreshing I had to share again. Happy Sunday All!

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